NU 629 Discussion 1: Trauma-Informed Care as Relating to Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

Sample Answer for NU 629 Discussion 1: Trauma-Informed Care as Relating to Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Included After Question

Initial Post

For this week’s discussion, define trauma-informed care (TIC), explain how stress and health are related, and discuss how an APRN can utilize this information in caring for vulnerable populations. Please include at least 3 scholarly sources within your initial post.

A Sample Answer For the Assignment: NU 629 Discussion 1: Trauma-Informed Care as Relating to Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

Title: NU 629 Discussion 1: Trauma-Informed Care as Relating to Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

Definition of Trauma-Informed Care (TIC)

Trauma-informed care (TIC) is a model of care for healthcare professionals in which trauma-inducing events that have occurred in patients’ lives are identified and acknowledged; this information is then used to better understand patients, connect with them, tailor appropriate care plans, and improve patient outcomes (Berg-Poppe et al., 2021). In the pediatric setting, traumatic or negative events that would precede the need for trauma-informed care are usually categorized as adverse childhood experiences (ACE) (Huang et al., 2021).

Stress & Health Relationship

Emotional/mental stress and physical health are inherently intertwined. Stress can contribute to a lack of engagement in health-promoting behaviors (exercise, healthy eating), weight gain, and decreased immune function (Thomas-Davis et al., 2020). In addition, stress (both current and historical), can lead to maladaptive coping mechanisms, depression, anxiety, and issues maintaining relationships (Thomas-Davis et al., 2020). Maslow’s hierarchy of needs illustrates how when patients are experiencing stress and do not feel secure in their current state, they have challenges reaching their full potential in all other areas, which hinders their overall health (Crandall et al., 2020).

APRN Application

As a future pediatric APRN, I will be caring for the vulnerable population of children. I will make a great effort to integrate trauma-informed care into my practice and advocate for it to be commonplace in my organization, like many others are doing in pediatric care (Berg-Poppe et al., 2021). Knowing that adverse childhood experiences (both traumatic and non-traumatic) have such a profound impact on the future mental and physical health of children and adults reiterates the importance of employing trauma-informed care programs into practice as early as possible to assure more sensitive, effective care for our patients (Huang et al., 2021).

References

Berg-Poppe, P., Anis Abdellatif, M., Cerny, S., LaPlante, K., Merrigan, M., & Wesner, C. (2021). Changes in knowledge, beliefs, self-efficacy, and  affective commitment to change following trauma-informed care education for pediatric service providers. Psychological Trauma: 

Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy. https://doi.org/10.1037/tra0001083

Crandall, A., Powell, E. A., Bradford, G. C., Magnusson, B. M., Hanson, C. L., Barnes, M. D., Novilla, M. L. B., & Bean, R. A. (2020). Maslow’s hierarchy of needs as a framework for understanding adolescent depressive symptoms over time. Journal of Child & Family Studies, 

            29(2), 273–281. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-019-01577-4

Huang, Y., Liu, H., & Masum, M. (2021). Adverse childhood experiences and physical and mental health of adults: Assessing the mediating 

            role of cumulative life course poverty. American Journal of Health Promotion, 35(5), 637–647.

Thomas-Davis, A., Bullock, A. P., Hooper, H., & McCluney, M. K. (2020). The effects of stress on first-year graduate students in health 

            professions. Journal of the National Society of Allied Health, 17(1), 56–62.

A Sample Answer 2 For the Assignment: NU 629 Discussion 1: Trauma-Informed Care as Relating to Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

Title: NU 629 Discussion 1: Trauma-Informed Care as Relating to Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

A great majority of people in this world have experienced some form of trauma whether it is in their past or recent. Everything we go through in life has an impact on us, either good or bad. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration defines trauma as: “an event, series of events, or set of circumstances experienced by an individual as physically or emotionally harmful or life-threatening with lasting adverse effects on the individual’s functioning and mental, physical, social, emotional, or spiritual well-being” (“Understanding the effects of trauma on health”, 2017). It is estimated that about one in four children experience maltreatment in their life, one in four women experience domestic violence, and one in five women and one in seventy one men experience rape in their life (Tello, 2018).

To further discuss trauma among children, it is estimated that almost half of all American children younger than 18 years old have experienced at least one traumatic event in their life (Forkey et al., 2021). As a pediatric registered nurse, I have had a lot of patients who fear different aspects of their hospital stay whether it is getting stuck with a needle or having a procedure done. I also have had patients who have been physically and sexually assaulted.

There really is a lot that happens to people, regardless of age, that we don’t know about until we have to assess them and either find something on them or can interpret that something happened to them based on how they act or what they say. Trauma experienced in childhood has a high risk of causing stress, PTSD, disruptive behaviors, substance abuse, anxiety, and depression (McLaughlin & Lambert, 2017). As a future pediatric nurse practitioner, it will be important to treat all my patients as if something may have happened in their past and has caused them to act the way they are. It’s also important that APRN’s don’t push for information from patients.

References

Forkey, H., Szilagyi, M., Kelly, E. T., & Duffee, J. (2021, August). Trauma-informed care. American Academy of Pediatrics. Retrieved October 12, 2021, from https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/148/2/e2021052580.

McLaughlin, K. A., & Lambert, H. K. (2017, April). Child trauma exposure and psychopathology: Mechanisms of risk and resilience. NCBI. Retrieved October 12, 2021, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5111863/.

Tello, M. (2018, October 16). Trauma-informed care: What it is, and why it’s important. Harvard Health. Retrieved October 12, 2021, from https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/trauma-informed-care-what-it-is-and-why-its-important-2018101613562.

Understanding the effects of trauma on health. (2017, June). Retrieved October 12, 2021, from https://www.traumainformedcare.chcs.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/Fact-Sheet-Understanding-Effects-of-Trauma.pdf.