NRS 410 Explain the risk factors for osteoporosis

Sample Answer for NRS 410 Explain the risk factors for osteoporosis Included After Question

Topic 5 DQ 2

Explain the risk factors for osteoporosis. What can a nurse do to help manage this health condition to restore the patient to optimal health?

A Sample Answer For the Assignment: NRS 410 Explain the risk factors for osteoporosis

Title: NRS 410 Explain the risk factors for osteoporosis 

Osteoporosis can affect anyone, either men or women of all races. While osteoporosis is more common in women, men are also at risk of having the disease (Rinonapoli et al., 2021). However, there are significant alterations between men and women concerning osteoporosis. For men, bone loss starts at an advanced age and progresses more slowly. Osteoporosis in men can be triggered by various diseases such as intestinal disorders, which result in poor absorption of bone-boosting nutrients. Prostate cancer medication can predispose men to low bone mass and fractures. Low testosterone production can also affect bone mass.

Reference

Rinonapoli, G., Ruggiero, C., Meccariello, L., Bisaccia, M., Ceccarini, P., & Caraffa, A. (2021). Osteoporosis in men: a review of an underestimated bone condition. International Journal of Molecular Sciences22(4), 2105. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22042105

A Sample Answer 2 For the Assignment: NRS 410 Explain the risk factors for osteoporosis

Title: NRS 410 Explain the risk factors for osteoporosis 

Women have a higher incidence of osteoporosis than men, but men are also at risk. One of every five men is estimated to experience fragility fractures at least once in their lifetime (Rinonapoli et al., 2021). Men have greater bone mass than women, bone loss generally begins later and advances slower than in women, and men often develop secondary osteoporosis. 20-40% of osteoporosis in women is secondary to extraskeletal diseases, and this percentage rises to 65% in men (Rinonapoli et al., 2021). Some risk factors include family history, chronic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, low testosterone levels, medications such as glucocorticoids, thyroid hormone, and chemotherapies, and lack of physical activity, alcoholism, and smoking, among others (Rinonapoli et al., 2021). Literature suggests that there are few studies on osteoporosis in men and that the condition is underdiagnosed and undertreated (Rinonapoli et al., 2021).  

Reference

Rinonapoli, G., Ruggiero, C., Meccariello, L., Bisaccia, M., Ceccarini, P., & Caraffa, A. (2021). Osteoporosis in men: A review of an underestimated bone condition. International Journal of Molecular Sciences22(4), 2105. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22042105

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A Sample Answer 3 For the Assignment: NRS 410 Explain the risk factors for osteoporosis

Title: NRS 410 Explain the risk factors for osteoporosis 

Educating patients on risk factors and ways to prevent osteoporosis or, if already diagnosed, how to avoid disease complications is essential. Education for males is similar to that for females. First, the nurse would need to assess what the patient knows about osteoporosis and the patient’s learning preference. Depending on the patient’s preferred way of learning, education can be provided through printed materials, videos, and online resources. The Bone Health & Osteoporosis Foundation (https://www.bonehealthandosteoporosis.org/) offers many patient resources and support, including educational materials, podcasts, blogs, and support groups. 

Education would include the importance of increasing calcium and vitamin D intake, eating a healthy diet, and limiting alcohol. Regular exercise may decrease fracture risk by improving bone mass, strengthening muscles, and improving balance, thus may reduce fall risk (Rosen, 2021). Smoking cessation is another lifestyle change that must be emphasized, as smoking is known to speed up the bone loss (Rosen, 2021). Fall prevention strategies are necessary, as falling increases the risk of osteoporotic fractures. Nurses must educate patients on safety measures such as removing items that could cause tripping, slipping, and falling, like rugs and electrical cords, ensuring adequate lighting in and around the home, getting regular eye exams and wearing their glasses, and avoiding walking in unfamiliar or uneven areas (Rosen, 2021). Education should also include medications prescribed to treat osteoporosis, for example, oral biphosphonates, have specific instructions on how and when to take them. In addition, the nurse must educate patients on potential side effects and complications with medications and instruct them to keep all doctor’s appointments for follow-up and monitoring. 

Reference

Rosen, H. N. (2021). Patient education: Osteoporosis prevention and treatment (beyond the basics) (C. J. Rosen & J. E. Mulder, Eds.). UpToDate. Retrieved August 18, 2022, from https://www.uptodate.com/contents/osteoporosis-prevention-and-treatment-beyond-the-basics?csi=0f1cb00b-eff6-4d01-98f5-e89e35c45a56%26source=contentShare

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A Sample Answer 4 For the Assignment: NRS 410 Explain the risk factors for osteoporosis

Title: NRS 410 Explain the risk factors for osteoporosis 

I agree with you that Osteoporosis is associated with the reduced mineral density causing bone porosity. The condition also expose patients to a high risk of fractures. Osteoporosis is known to target bone and bone tissues (Pouresmaeili et al., 2018). Unfortunately, the health complication may interfere with movement in the affected areas. The risk factors for this bone complication can be characterized as either environmental or genetic. Occasionally, both genetic and environmental factors can expose an individual to osteoporosis. The genetic risk factors include being female, family causes, and increased age and early menopause. Poor living conditions may also expose population to osteoporosis (Zheng et al., 2018). Osteoporosis is a common bone complication due to usual environmental and genetic risk factors. Therefore, people are recommended to check on their lifestyle choices. Nurses can use their positions and knowledge to educate patients about osteoporosis. Sensitization will help patients to manage the condition. At the same time, people having patients of the same complication may learn much from sensitization.

NRS 410 Explain the risk factors for osteoporosis
NRS 410 Explain the risk factors for osteoporosis

References

Pouresmaeili, F., Kamalidehghan, B., Kamarehei, M., & Goh, Y. M. (2018). A comprehensive overview on osteoporosis and its risk factors. Therapeutics and clinical risk management14, 2029. doi: 10.2147/TCRM.S138000

Zheng, J. P., Miao, H. X., Zheng, S. W., Chen, C. Q., Zhong, H. B., Li, S. F., … & Sun, C. H. (2018). Risk factors for osteoporosis in liver cirrhosis patients measured by transient elastography. Medicine97(20). doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000010645

A Sample Answer 5 For the Assignment: NRS 410 Explain the risk factors for osteoporosis

Title: NRS 410 Explain the risk factors for osteoporosis 

Osteoporosis is a disease that causes the bones to become increasingly frail and brittle, which increases the risk of the bone fracture. It can affect anyone of any age, gender, or racial background. Those who are most likely to be afflicted are women of advanced age. A number of factors, including the following, can contribute to the development of osteoporosis. Osteoporosis tends to run in families.

Gender: A woman’s risk of acquiring osteoporosis is greater than a man’s risk of developing the disease.

Age; the likelihood of acquiring osteoporosis increases with each passing year of life.

 A body frame that is delicate and small People who have a body frame that is delicate and small have an elevated risk of getting osteoporosis.

Diet: An higher risk of osteoporosis is connected with a diet that is lacking in calcium and vitamin D. This is because calcium and vitamin D are necessary for bone health

 Living a sedentary lifestyle: People who don’t get enough exercise and don’t move around much have a higher chance of acquiring osteoporosis.

 Cigarette smoking is linked to an increased risk of getting osteoporosis later in life.

Consuming an excessive amount of alcohol is another factor that can boost the chance of developing osteoporosis.

 The significance of consuming adequate amounts of calcium and vitamin D in order to preserve bone health should be made known to the patient. One-on-one therapy, educational sessions with a group of people, as well as written materials, are all viable options for achieving this goal. Additionally, the nurse is able to educate the patient on the greatest sources of calcium and vitamin D, which include dairy products, leafy green vegetables, and meals that have been fortified.

The nurse should assist the patient in developing a nutritious meal plan that include foods that are high in calcium and vitamin D.

participating in regular physical helps to strengthen bones and lower the chance of falling. The nurse might, for instance, present the patient with information on bone-strengthening activities and then direct the patient to local resources, such as community fitness programs or exercise groups designed specifically for older persons.

To lessen the likelihood of the patient falling, assistance in the establishment of safe conditions is important. Performing tasks such as building handrails, reducing potential tripping hazards, and providing adequate lighting may be required. For instance, the nurse can assist the patient in recognizing potential dangers that exist in their own home and offer recommendations on how to eliminate or mitigate those dangers.

Keep an eye on the patient’s medication schedule to make sure they are following the instructions on how to take their osteoporosis medicine. Determine the patient’s level of discomfort and administer appropriate pain medication as required.

If the patient is a smoker, he/she is encourage to quit.

Assisting the patient in coping with the mental impacts of osteoporosis, such as depression, anxiety, and problems with body image. the patient is made aware of the resources and support organizations available in their neighborhood. For patients who have osteoporosis.

Reference

Falkner, A. & Green, S. Z. (2018). Musculoskeletal, metabolism, and multisystem complexities. In Grand Canyon University (Eds.). Pathophysiology: Clinical applications for client health, (1st ed.). https://lc.gcumedia.com/nrs410v/pathophysiology-clinical-applications-for-client-health/v1.1/#/chapter/5

Tu, K. N., Lie, J. D., Wan, C., Cameron, M., Austel, A. G., Nguyen, J. K., Van, K., & Hyun, D. (2018). Osteoporosis: A review of treatment options. P & T: A Peer-Reviewed Journal for Formulary Management43(2), 92–104

A Sample Answer 6 For the Assignment: NRS 410 Explain the risk factors for osteoporosis

Title: NRS 410 Explain the risk factors for osteoporosis 

Risk factors for osteoporosis include being a female, old age because, with aging, bones become weaker and lose density, a family history of osteoporosis, a history of fracture, having light and thin bones, menopause because, with age, levels of estrogen reduce, making bones to lose density, and being a Latino, white or Asian (Pouresmaeili et al., 2018). The modifiable risk factors for osteoporosis include lack of physical activity, smoking, weight loss, insufficient nutritional absorption, calcium and vitamin D deficiency, alcohol intake, stress, and air pollution (Pouresmaeili et al., 2018). To manage osteoporosis, a nurse should first educate the patient to understand the condition and the treatment regimen. This education will focus on interventions to slow or arrest the disease and strategies to relieve the symptoms. In addition, the patient will be educated about relieving pain, for example, sleeping on a firm mattress, encouraging good posture, and training on body mechanics. The patient should also be educated on food rich in calcium and vitamin D to protect against skeletal demineralization and intake of high fluids and rich dietary fiber to prevent constipation (Pouresmaeili et al., 2018). The patient will also be encouraged to exercise regularly and stop consuming alcohol, carbonated drinks, caffeine, and smoking cessation(Falkner & Green, 2018).

References

Falkner, A. & Green, S. Z. (2018). Musculoskeletal, metabolism, and multisystem complexities. In Grand Canyon University (Eds.). Pathophysiology: Clinical applications for client health, (1st ed.). https://lc.gcumedia.com/nrs410v/pathophysiology-clinical-applications-for-client-health/v1.1/#/chapter/5

Pouresmaeili, F., Kamali Dehghan, B., Kamarehei, M., & Yong Meng, G. (2018). A comprehensive overview on osteoporosis and its risk factors. Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, 14, 2029-2049. https://doi.org/10.2147/tcrm.s138000

A Sample Answer 7 For the Assignment: NRS 410 Explain the risk factors for osteoporosis

Title: NRS 410 Explain the risk factors for osteoporosis 

Osteoporosis is caused by an imbalance between bone resorption and formation, causing decreased bone mass and tissue. There is an increased risk of fragility, especially in the elderly which increases the risk for falls (Pouresmaeili et al., 2018). Some modifiable risk factors include things like, smoking, lack of physical activity, weight loss, alcohol use. Other risk factors include things like prolonged use of steroids, vitamin d def, certain diseases such as diabetes and kidney disease. Ageing, white race, history of prior fractures and genetic factors also have an impact on osteoporosis (Pouresmaeili et al., 2018).

As nurses we can encourage health promoting behaviors to our patients, such as eating a healthy diet. With adequate amount of calcium and vitamin D. patients may need to be educated to abstain away from alcohol and cigarette use. Physical activity is also important to help with bone mass and strength. Activities such as aerobics, resistance and weight-bearing exercises help in repairing of the bone (Pouresmaeili et al., 2018).

Knowledge about osteoporosis and awareness is very important especially for the elderly because they are at higher risk of falling. When the elderly fall and have osteoporosis, they are more likely to suffer from bone fractures and other serious complications. More than 8.9 million fractures happen every year (Resnick et al., 2014). Recommending things such as a non-slip rug, and shoes, and the use of assistive devices can greatly decrease a patient’s risk for falls (Resnick et al., 2014).

Pouresmaeili, F., Kamalidehghan, B., Kamarehei, M., & Goh, Y. M. (2018). A comprehensive overview on osteoporosis and its risk factors. Therapeutics and clinical risk management14, 2029–2049. https://doi.org/10.2147/TCRM.S138000

Resnick, B., Nahm, E. S., Zhu, S., Brown, C., An, M., Park, B., & Brown, J. (2014). The impact of osteoporosis, falls, fear of falling, and efficacy expectations on exercise among community-dwelling older adults. Orthopedic nursing33(5), 277–288. https://doi.org/10.1097/NOR.0000000000000084

A Sample Answer 8 For the Assignment: NRS 410 Explain the risk factors for osteoporosis

Title: NRS 410 Explain the risk factors for osteoporosis 

Osteoporosis is a condition in which bones become weak over time and may break easily. Osteoporosis most commonly affects bones in the hip, wrist, and spine. The body breaks down old bone tissue and replaces it with new tissue, which helps keep the bones strong. When a person reaches the age of about 30 years, their bone mass stops increasing. In the bones of a person with osteoporosis, the spaces in the structure of bone tissue widen and become porous. This makes the bones less dense, and the outer shell of the bone thins. The bones become weaker and more brittle, increasing the risk of fractures. Osteoporosis, or bone loss, affects people of all different ages and backgrounds.

There are certain risk factors that may make you more susceptible to developing osteoporosis. Some of the most common osteoporosis risk factors are often unavoidable; that is, you can’t control their occurrence. These factors include: being female: Osteoporosis is more common in women than in men about 80% of cases affect women. being older: As we age, our bones naturally lose some density and become weaker, a family history of osteoporosis, a history of broken bones, a small, thin frame, People with lighter, thinner bones are more prone osteoporosis, Osteoporosis affects all races and ethnicities, menopause: Menopause is marked by a steep drop in estrogen, which is a female sex hormone that protects bones, lifestyle behaviors that you can control that will also impact your chances of developing the disease. Eating a diet low in calcium and vitamin D, lack of exercise. While there are many risk factors you can’t control such as sex and age there are ways you can curb your chances of developing osteoporosis. Eating a healthy diet and getting plenty of exercise will help maintain strong bones that will support you as you age.

Nursing care of patients with osteoporosis includes assessing the patient’s physical functioning and ability to complete self-care. Nursing management should include encouraging weight-bearing activity, assisting the patient with self-care as needed, and providing ambulatory aid for patients who have an unsteady gait. In addition, the nurse is responsible for providing patient education relating to healthy dietary intake rich in calcium and vitamin D, smoking cessation, limited alcohol intake, and the prescribed medications since patients’ lack of adherence to the medication regimen is not uncommon.

Reference

Cherney, K. (2018). What are musculoskeletal disorders? Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/health/musculoskeletal-disorders

Falkner, A. & Green, S. Z. (2018). Musculoskeletal, metabolism, and multisystem complexities. In Grand Canyon University (Eds.). Pathophysiology: Clinical applications for client health, (1st ed.). https://lc.gcumedia.com/nrs410v/pathophysiology-clinical-applications-for-client-health/v1.1/#/chapter/5

A Sample Answer 9 For the Assignment: NRS 410 Explain the risk factors for osteoporosis

Title: NRS 410 Explain the risk factors for osteoporosis 

One of the most common problems affecting the musculoskeletal system is osteoporosis. This is a condition characterized by decreased bone density, resulting in weakness and brittleness of the bones. The bones become very fragile and fracture easily, often after only a slight trauma. The sites most affected are the vertebrae, the hip, and the wrist. Osteoporosis results from the aging of the bone remodeling process. Pouresmaeili et al (2018) assert that before age 45 or so, bone formation, or absorption, is greater than bone loss, or resorption. After age 45, the process reverses, and bone mass is lost. Risk factors that appear to increase the occurrence of osteoporosis include cigarette smoking, high caffeine intake, excessive alcohol intake, a high-protein diet, a history of low dietary calcium, low vitamin D, a slender body build with little body fat, and a sedentary lifestyle.

Nurses can help manage this health condition by assisting the patient to assume a positive mental attitude and outlook on life. Much of this includes making sure our patients remain active, as exercise is extremely important in maintaining motor function. The exercise must be appropriate to the abilities of the person (Tu et al, 2018). Walking, swimming, dancing, jogging, stretching, and aerobics are all beneficial in maintaining bone and muscle strength. Counseling our patients on good nutrition an (including supplementation), along with safety is paramount to the management of this health condition.

REFERENCES

Pouresmaeili, F., Kamalidehghan, B., Kamarehei, M., & Goh, Y. M. (2018). A comprehensive overview on osteoporosis and its risk factors. Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management14, 2029–2049. https://doi.org/10.2147/TCRM.S138000

Tu, K. N., Lie, J. D., Wan, C., Cameron, M., Austel, A. G., Nguyen, J. K., Van, K., & Hyun, D. (2018). Osteoporosis: A review of treatment options. P & T: A Peer-Reviewed Journal for Formulary Management43(2), 92–104.