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NURS 6003 Discussion: Examining Nursing Specialties

Discussion: Examining Nursing Specialties

https://nursingpaperslayers.com/discussion-examining-nursing-specialties-nurs-6003/

You have probably seen one or more of the many inspirational posters about decisions. A visual such as a forked road or a street sign is typically pictured, along with a quote designed to inspire.

Decisions are often not so easily inspired. Perhaps you discovered this when choosing a specialty within the MSN program. This decision is a critical part of your plan for success, and you no doubt want to get it

Discussion Examining Nursing Specialties NURS 6003

Discussion Examining Nursing Specialties NURS 6003

right. This is yet another area where your network can help, as well as other sources of information that can help you make an informed choice.

ORDER NOW FOR AN ORIGINAL PAPER ON Discussion: Examining Nursing Specialties NURS 6003

To Prepare:

By Day 3 of Week 10

Post an explanation of your choice of a nursing specialty within the program. Describe any difficulties you had (or are having) in making your choice, and the factors that drove/are driving your decision. Identify at least one professional organization affiliated with your chosen specialty and provide details on becoming a member. Discussion: Examining Nursing Specialties NURS 6003

Discussion: Examining Nursing Specialties NURS 6003

Discussion: Examining Nursing Specialties NURS 6003 SAMPLE 1

I’ve been a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurse for close to fourteen years. Precepting nursing students for their internship and orienting freshly graduating nurses is one of my favorite components of my position as a bedside nurse. I appreciate reading and learning new evidence-based practice guidelines to improve patient care and long-term outcomes for newborns, as well as sharing this information with my colleagues. Teaching has become a passion for me, and several coworkers have suggested that I teach full-time because I am able to explain things well and have extensive understanding of NICU nursing. My children are now adults and in college, so I’ve opted to pursue my Master of Science in Nursing degree (MSN). I knew I did not want an administrative post or 24-hour call shifts as a neonatal nurse practitioner, as much as I enjoy bedside care. MSN in Nursing Education seemed to best align with my passion for teaching and professional objectives. I wish to continue in my work as a NICU clinical nurse educator and transition into a parent educator after completing my MSN.

Discussion: Examining Nursing Specialties NURS 6003

We here often of the critical nursing shortage. Many reasons exist as to why nurses leave the bedside, but what about bringing new nurses to the profession? Qualified students try to get in nursing school and end up wait listed due to faculty shortages. Those students often choose a different profession. To combat this issue, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing lobbied for federal funding for faulty development programs (Shipman & Hooten, 2008). This contributed to my decision to pursue the specialty of nursing education with my MSN. I knew I would not have difficulty finding a position if I choose to become an academic instructor.

I love helping my coworkers learn more about NICU care and evidence-based practices. I also designed, implemented, and participate in our unit-based nurse mentor program. I developed a standardized orientation pathway for our newly graduated nurses to acclimate to their new career. I participate in multiple committees, such as developmental and unit council. Those are all great ways for clinical nurse educators to provide teaching formally and informally (Jenkins, 2008).

The first national organization to lobby for funding for nurse education research was the National League of Nurses (NLN). This professional organization focuses on nursing schools and faculty, and leaders in nursing education. After reviewing the benefits of the NLN membership, I discovered the cost is only $80 for graduate school students. One of the biggest benefits was free access to the publication ‘Nursing Education Perspectives” (NLN, n.d.)

I am excited to pursue my MSN with the specialty focus of nursing education. Teaching the next generation of nurses is so important to our professional. I look forward to the opportunity to inspire others to keep pushing nursing forward.

Discussion: Examining Nursing Specialties NURS 6003 Peer Responses

Submission and Grading Information

Hello T..,

Your discussion post was very relatable for me because we share the same background. You specialize as a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurse for 14 years, I share a similar background having specialized in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) for almost 15 years. At some point in my ICU career, I also floated a lot in the NICU when I was a travel nurse. These areas of nursing are highly specialized and very challenging but provides a lot of fulfillment specially in working with the parents of the children toward their recovery. The career journey in nursing never ends and keeping a plan in mind and persevering to push forward will help us to be successful (Laureate Education, 2018). Completing more than a decade of experience speaks a lot about your dedication for your chosen field of specialty.

As you mentioned, one aspect of being a senior nurse is the task of being a mentor, role model, and leader for new nurses. I share the same passion in teaching, that is why I eventually chose to be a nurse educator. Echevarria (2018) said that membership in a nursing organization provides a lot of opportunities for professional growth by engaging in educational opportunities that will enrich our knowledge and experience. My membership with different organizations did not only help me complete my continuing education requirements for license renewal, it also provided me with relevant knowledge of best practices that I implemented in my practice.

You mentioned that you became a member of the mentorship program in your unit and you developed standardized orientation pathways. This is a great tool to make learning more consistent. Was this something that you originally conceptualized or was it based from a similar model that you adapted? Thank you for sharing your great thoughts about how your profession evolved, it is very inspiring.

Reference:

Echevarria, I. M. (2018). Make connections by joining a professional nursing organization. Nursing, 48(12), 35–38.

Laureate Education (Producer). (2018). The Walden Journey to a Masters in Nursing: Final Thoughts [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author

Hi Teresa,

It’s nice to meet someone that has the same passion for teaching like me! The difference is you have an extensive amount of experience whereas I am just joining this rewarding career.  I am sure being a NICU nurse is a difficult and challenging specialty and it is wonderful that you are willing to teach nurses that are new to the specialty. I would like to join our ED education committee to help teach nurses various skills and protocols to ensure we are providing safe and quality care. Acquiring proper strategies in teaching to provide quality education contributes to many positive outcomes for staff and patients. According to Vaismoradi, the strengths and weaknesses in curricula and teaching strategies that they identify can inform our efforts to improve nursing education and improve systems of care (2011).

Have you thought about joining the National Association of Neonatal Nurses? This organization is focused solely on NICU nurses and provides education, conferences, and CNE hours. This membership costs $130 for the year and a cheaper rate each year you renew your membership. I think that this organization would be great for you and all of your expertise in this specialty. As you stated, you enjoy reading evidence-based practice guidelines which this organization provides endless protocols and guidelines that you could contribute to as well.

I wish you all the best on journey! Im sure you will be a great educator!

 References 

National Association of Neonatal Nurses. (2020). Join or Renew. Retrieved November 04, 2020, from http://nann.org/membership/join

Vaismoradi, M. (2011, May 23). Patient safety: Nursing students’ perspectives and the role of nursing education to provide safe care. Retrieved November 04, 2020, from https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1466-7657.2011.00882.x

Hello T…,

Neonatal Intensive Care Nurse! Wow! These are words that imply so much love, respect, and dedication. For sure, I cannot do your job. But I did enjoy this clinical rotation when I was in nursing school. I membered I signed for a summer internship, thinking that this was my path. But upon graduation, I was placed in ICU for one year, then I was appointed Nursing Supervisor for two more years, and then I signed a contract to work in Jamaica.  The experience there was fascinating. I worked in the burn unit and the female surgical service. After completing my agreement with the government, I decided to teach, and this was when I discovered my call. I have been teaching since 2003.

I came across an article that summarizes the history of your specialization in the United States. I learned that neonatology was not officially recognized as a pediatric subspecialty until 1975 (Honeyfield, 2009).  The neonatal nursing role has a history of almost 40 years, and the specialization continues advancing, providing optimism and security for neonatal nurses.

You said that you enjoy precepting new students and staff and that you learn from them as well. An excellent educator sees endless opportunities to learn from his/her students. Teachers and learners depend on one another to succeed (Harvard Graduate School of Education, 2020). I am glad you decided to pursue a master’s in education. A piece of advice from one educator to another would be to get to know your students as much as possible and to ensure that you positively affect their lives.

References

Harvard Graduate School of Education. (2020). Two-way learning. Creating a classroom culture

of reciprocity, where teachers and students are learners first https://www.gse.harvard.edu/news/uk/16/01/two-way-learning

Honeyfield, M. E. (2009). Neonatal nurse practitioners: Past, present, and future. Advances in

 Neonatal Care: Official Journal of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses9(3), 125–128. https://doi-org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1097/ANC.0b013e3181a8369f

SAMPLE 3

RE: Discussion – Week 10

          Prior to beginning my journey at Walden, I had been attending a different university to obtain my nurse practitioner degree in adult health and gerontology.  As it would happen, life had different plans for me in terms of clinical site availability and my husband’s job and prioritizing my family.  In hindsight, I am so incredibly happy it did.  I knew that at some point, I would be going back to school.  However, I was unsure of which direction to take.  Life then again happened, and I had the privilege to be appointed interim nurse manager of my unit.  This experience opened my eyes and embedded exactly where I wanted my future to go.  Nursing leadership is my calling and for this reason, I chose the Master of Science in Nursing Executive program through Walden University (Walden University, n.d.).

Being a member of and being involved in nursing organizations can assist nurses in achieving their career goals (Echevarria, 2018).  With the wide array of organizations available, it is important to pick those which align best with your current practice and how they can benefit you (Echevarria, 2018).  An organization in which I have included in my networking opportunities, is the American Organization for Nursing Leadership (2015).  They offer a multitude of educational and networking opportunities to expand your knowledge base and employment outlook (American Organization for Nursing Leadership, 2015).  Once completing my degree, I plan on becoming a member.  There is a fee associated with membership and so I will not be pursuing other organizations since having a number of memberships can become expensive (Echevarria, 2018).

References

American Organization for Nursing Leadership. (2015). AONL Nurse Executive competencies. Retrieved from https://www.aonl.org/resources/nurse-leader- competencies

Echevarria, I. M. (2018). Make connections by joining a professional nursing organization. Nursing, 48(12), 35–38.

Walden University. (n.d.). Master of Science in Nursing (MSN). Retrieved November 3, 2020, from https://www.waldenu.edu/masters/master-of-science-in-nursing

Learning Resources

Required Readings

Bickford, C. J., Marion, L., & Gazaway, S. (2015). Nursing: Scope and standards of practice, third edition – 2015. Retrieved from http://ebooks.iospress.nl/publication/12524

Cherry, B., Caramanica, L, Everett, L. Q., Fennimore, L., & Elaine, S. (2019). Leveraging the power of board leadership in professional nursing organizations. JONA: The Journal of Nursing Administration, 49(11), 517-519.

Echevarria, I. M. (2018). Make connections by joining a professional nursing organization. Nursing, 48(12), 35–38.

Truant, R., & Chan, R. J. (2017). Future ready: Strengthening oncology nursing leadership in the context of professional oncology nursing organizations. Canadian Oncology Nursing Journal, 27(1), 2-4.

Walden University. (n.d.). Master of Science in Nursing (MSN). Retrieved November 14, 2018, from https://www.waldenu.edu/masters/master-of-science-in-nursing

Document: Academic Success and Professional Development Plan Template (Word document)

Choose among the following to review your specialization’s Scope and Standards of Practice or Competencies:

American Nurses Association. (2015). Nursing informatics: Scope and standards of practice (2nd ed.). Silver Spring, MD: Author.

“The Scope of Nursing Informatics Practice: Functional Areas of Nursing Informatics” (pp. 18–39)

Nursing Education

Website: Competencies for the Academic Nurse Educator

National League for Nursing. (2019). Nurse educator core competency. Retrieved from http://www.nln.org/professional-development-programs/competencies-for-nursing-education/nurse-educator-core-competency

Note: The competencies for the Academic Nurse Educator do not encompass the competencies or scope and standards of practice for the Nursing Professional Developer. The set of competencies associated with that specific role within the Nurse Education specialization will be examined in future competencies throughout your specialization program of study.

Nurse Executive

Website: Nurse Executive Competencies

Discussion: Examining Nursing Specialties NURS 6003 American Organization for Nursing Leadership. (2015). AONL Nurse Executive competencies. Retrieved from https://www.aonl.org/resources/nurse-leader-competencies

Public Health Nursing

Website: Public Health Nursing Competencies

Quad Council Coalition. (2018). Community/Public Health Nursing [C/PHN] competencies. Retrieved from http://www.quadcouncilphn.org/documents-3/2018-qcc-competencies/

American Nurses Association. (2013). Public health nursing: Scope and standards of practice (2nd ed.). Silver Spring, MD: Author.

Discussion – Week 10 Examining Nursing Specialties

Post-Master’s Certificate in Nursing Executive

I have always been fascinated by Nursing Education and Leadership. As a teacher, I have the ability to breakdown complex concepts into small pieces of information, facilitating understanding and comprehension. Teaching, educating, and influencing future generations of healthcare professionals has been my imperative goal since I completed a master’s program in Advance Nursing Education. However, with the transition from Jamaica to the United States, my teaching duties have been on hold to a certain extent. As a leader, I have found a way to convey my teaching skills into daily practice outside the classroom. Leaders mentor, coach, empower, motivate.

Although my passion for leadership and education goes hand in hand, the decision to pursue the Post Master’s Certificate in Nursing Executive responds to a strategy I had to play to obtain an RN license in the state of Georgia. I am thankful that Walden University offers such a convenient program.  The post master’s certificate adds greater depth and value to my portfolio, enhancing professional respect and recognition. (Walden University, 2020). In the end, the benefits of completing the post mater’s certificate will be immeasurable.

Current Difficulties and Factors Driving the Decision

As an international nurse, the transition from Cuba to Jamaica to the United States has not been easy. Passing the NCLEX and obtaining the RN license endorsement in GA have been the two most difficult tasks I have ever faced. Not being able to obtain the endorsement is the driving force to pursue the postmasters’ certificate. The Georgia Board of Nursing only accepts credential evaluations from the Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (CGFNS). This agency requires transcripts to be sent directly from the university where the applicant completed the program of study. Although I graduated with a master’s degree from The University of the West Indies in Jamaica, and the CGFNS has already received the transcripts, they cannot issue the evaluation without the BSN documentation. Cuba is a particular country that, due to political reasons, does not release transcripts. Long story short, to qualify for license endorsement in GA, I decided to complete a program in this country to, basically, end the nightmare of transcripts. I also hold a multi-state license issued in FL, and even though GA is a member of the eNLC, many employers still require a GA license. I was surprised that after a year of sending countless applications and receiving no for an answer, I was accepted at a rehabilitation center. Without having previous experience in this area, I had to accept the offer.

Professional Organization

The American Organization for Nursing Leadership (AONL) is one of the organizations that I plan to join. The AONL is the voice of nursing leadership and the only organization dedicated to this specialized field. Previously known as the American Organization for Nurse Executives (AONE), the AONL changed its name in 2019 to better reflect its core mission and vision. These statements resonate with my future professional goals. The AONL mission is “to shape health care through innovative and expert nursing leadership.” Its vision is “Nursing leadership-one voice advancing health” (American Organization for Nursing Leadership, 2020a); among the benefits of joining this organization are networking and career development. The applicant can tailor his/her membership by selecting a specific type; for instance: full, associate, student, group and team, and international. I find this very flexible since nurse leaders are often appointed for a short period of time based on need instead of a career path. Additionally, the AONL offers the opportunity to professional nurses from other countries who support its mission and vision statements to become a member (American Organization for Nursing Leadership, 2020b).

References

American Organization for Nursing Leadership. (2020a). American Organization for Nursing

Leadership. https://www.aonl.org/about/overview

American Organization for Nursing Leadership. (2020b). Become an AONL Member.

https://www.aonl.org/membership/join

Walden University. (2020). An Opportunity to Make a Difference.

https://www.waldenu.edu/online-certificates-programs/nursing-post-masters/nurse-executive

Walden University MSN Core Nursing courses – Generic information for success:

  1. Being graduate level adult learners – It is very unlikely that you will experience the quantity of or detailed guidance as in the announcements received in this course. Being so: Read the course announcements thoroughly and completely. Read the course announcements at least daily for any updates. Going forward the Instructors may post items at any time throughout the day or night. I have unfortunately received emails throughout this course with questions for which the information was previously addressed within the announcements. Again, reading the course announcements is imperative for your success.
  2. The utilization requirement of APA within assignments will increase as you progress to courses that are considered “writing intense”. The APA requirement within discussions will remain as you experienced within this course. This course is not considered writing intense. Familiarize yourself with the correct usage of APA 7th edition. It is within every graded item, within every Nursing course going forward. Familiarize yourself and utilize the Walden resources for APA assistance. I have diligently posted links to those resources several times during this course.
  3. Use ONLY your Walden student email for communication with any Walden University representative. When communicating with your Instructor ALWAYS include your course number and section. Within this course I posted in the announcements numerous times your specific course number and section, as well asked that you include that information when emailing me. Sadly, I received emails that did not include this information, this delayed my assisting you as I had to request your course number and section. This alerts me that course announcements were not being thoroughly and completely reviewed. Going forward it is highly unlikely Instructors will respond to any email other than your Walden student email as email not in Walden origin routinely gets flagged as spam then deleted. Also be fully aware that Instructors required to respond to any email other than your designated Walden Student email.
  4. Be mindful if you do not participate in any Walden course during the 1st week (Day 1 through Day 7) – you will be removed from the course by Walden University regardless of your excuse. Your Instructor has no control over this – it is university policy!
  5. The grading of any assignment cannot proceed by your Instructor unless you submit your assignments via SafeAssign, then in BlackBoard. Traditionally a -0- score will be awarded, with no resubmission availability. At the Graduate level, you are responsible for your work being submitted per instructions AND grading rubric parameters and due date/time. Again, I strongly encourage you to submit your assignments before Day 7 to ensure yourself sufficient time to seek assistance and correct the issue. Remember SafeAssign Drafts and SafeAssign are different!
  6. For Discussions – There is a six (6) day period (Monday, Day 1 through Saturday, Day 6) allowed for the Discussion participation. No allowances for participation will be made outside of the six (6) Discussion active period. Any submitted post outside of the 6-day active discussion period will not be graded and you will receive a -0- score.
  7. Faculty cannot accept or grade any assignment or discussion through email.
  8. Do not wait until Day 7 to begin or submit your assignment. Assignments are due Day 7. At the Graduate level, you are responsible for your work being submitted per instructions, grading rubric parameters and due date and time. Being so = I strongly encourage you to submit your assignments well before Day 7 to ensure yourself sufficient time to seek assistance and correct any issue encountered. I have purposely made myself available to you each day including weekends and responded to you within 12 to 24 hours. Be mindful, Instructors are not required to respond to you on a daily basis. Going forward your Instructors will respond to your Contact the Instructor communications and emails within the required 48 hours’ time period.
  9. As a graduate level student, Instructors will not reach out to you to ensure your assignments/discussions are completed and submitted correctly. As a graduate level adult learner, it is your responsibility to ensure that your discussions and assignments are completed and submitted timely and correctly. As an adult learner, you need to take the initiative and reach out to your Instructor immediately when you encounter an issue. You were offered an online orientation by Walden University – Did you participate in that orientation? If not, I strongly suggest you contact your advisor and make arrangements.
  10. If you experience technical issues, please utilize your resources and contact the Walden Customer Care Team or Walden IT for assistance. Going forward you will encounter several PowerPoint presentations, Walden Templates within your future courses at Walden University, as well be required to submit multiple items with a single submission.
  11. Understand the Time Zones at Walden University and the applicable conversion. Your course calendar is in Eastern Time as is the time/date stamp of submission/participation for your discussions and assignments. Going forward all of your future Nursing courses require that your Discussions, any Quiz or Assignment will continue to be due submitted in Mountain Time.
  12. Have a computer and Internet backup plan. What will you do if your computer crashes or your Internet is not working?  Computer/Internet/work issues are your responsibility. Allowances will not be made due to these issues causing a lack of participation or missed deadline, rather a -0- score will be awarded. Save your work on a flash or hard drive. Know where you can go to access the Academic Skills Center as it is an excellent resource to assist in your success.
  13. For Assignments – Only prior communication with AND Instructor approval will late assignments be considered for grading. Assignments submitted late will be deducted 4% daily until Day 5 OR may deduct the entire 20% regardless of time/day of late submission. This is at the discretion of each Instructor and will vary course-by-course. After Day 5, in any course, the assignment will be scored a -0-.
  14. Be familiar with how to access and utilize the Walden resources. I posted the most useful and frequently utilized resources numerous times within the course announcements.
  15. Ensure your discussions have a substance, depth and breadth, critical analysis, and reflection element within the grading rubric. In short – if your discussion Main Post does not closely compare to the discussion exemplar located within the course resources and announcements posted within this course your grade will be drastically reduced.
  16. Know who and where to submit any documentation if necessary, for allowances for any late or missed assignments. Remember Instructors are not permitted to accept any medical documentation.
  17. Know who your advisor is and how to contact them.
  18. Know where and how to locate your student feedback. This course is 6 weeks in duration – In Week 5 I received emails inquiring as to “I see my grade but don’t know why points were deducted” – It was sadly apparent the feedback being provided was not being reviewed by those students. Your numeric score and student feedback are in different locations – this was addressed in the course announcements. If you cannot locate or have not located your student feedback for discussions and assignments – I strongly encourage you to contact the Customer Care Team as you have missed a tremendous amount of information.
RE: Discussion – Week 10

I worked on a gen/med floor in a level one trauma hospital when I started nursing.  It provided a good foundation for being a new nurse, but it was a slower-paced job than I was expecting.  Downtime has always been challenging for me, so I decided to change positions and become an intensive care nurse.  Here is where I found my passion for action, well, in a sense.  I felt a deep sense of accomplishment and had more confidence in my skills at the end of each shift.  And as I took on the position of charge nurse, I realized that I was good at being a leader. I enjoyed working in a high-intensity environment, and people responded well to me.  With this in mind, I decided to take things a step further in my career, so I applied to the Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner (AG-ACNP) program here at Walden.As an ICU travel nurse, technically a “COVID ICU travel nurse,” the workload has become more demanding in the past year and a half.  During this time, I couldn’t physically be with my family due to obvious reasons, which made coping alone difficult.  I also started noticing a feeling of being utterly drained of energy.  I was burned out!  According to research, health workers can encounter various psychological difficulties when working in high-pressure and high-risk situations, such as those associated with disasters and pandemics (Salamah, 2020).  So instead of taking the break I so desperately needed, I decided to head back to nursing school and keep that momentum of intensity going.  Unfortunately, distraction is a coping mechanism I have learned to master.  So it’s clear to say, here is where I’ve been struggling a bit with making a definite career choice.  Though I love taking care of patients and providing support to families, I started questioning whether or not working in a hospital setting as a nurse practitioner is what I wanted to do.  I knew I needed some guidance and clarity if I wanted to stay on the path of becoming an acute care NP.

Being an active member of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN), I knew that I would find information to tackle my fatigue and learn new ways to plan for career advancement in the field I once loved.  In addition, AACN provides resources to assist nurses in prioritizing their well-being while providing substantial care to patients and their families.  For example, nurse leaders affiliated with the organization offer sessions on practical mindful activities to improve personal and organizational resilience during current challenging times in healthcare.  As a result, nurses will learn to implement strategic pauses and thoughtful moments into their workday (Bay, 2021).

There are several professional nursing organizations whose primary focus is on critical care nursing for nurses practicing in acute care, one being AACN.  The AACN has provided progressive and critical care nurses with world-class resources, education, and support for over 50 years and has over 130,000 members (AACN, 2021).  Listed below are some of the membership options for those who are interested in joining.  Membership fees can be found on the AACN website.

  • Active membership is open to any registered nurse licensed in the United States interested in critical care nursing and is in good standing with their state or territory’s licensing office.  Additionally, nurses who work in research, administration, education, medical-surgical, telemetry, progressive care units, home health, or any other healthcare agency are qualified (AACN, 2021).
  • Any LVN or LPN, non-nurse professional, or student working in these fields, as well as any healthcare consumer or member of the business or political community, is eligible.  However, affiliate members cannot vote, hold office, or serve on national or chapter committees (AACN, 2021).
  • Professional nurses who have an RN license in a country other than the United States are eligible. Membership includes all AACN privileges; however, all benefits, including a member card, are provided digitally (through email or the Web).  International members are not eligible to run for office or participate on national or chapter committees (AACN, 2021).
  • Any resident of the United States (or a non-citizen of the United States who resides inside the United States) enrolled in an accredited professional nursing program and is not currently licensed as a registered nurse is eligible.  Membership in the AACN entitles them to all AACN advantages.  However, student members cannot vote, hold office, or serve on national or chapter committees (AACN, 2021).

References

American Association of Critical-Care Nurses. (2021). AACN Membership Types and Rates. https://www.aacn.org/membership/aacn-membership-types-and-rate

Bay, L. M. (2021). Mindfulness: Using Pause Principles to Enhance Your Nursing Practice. American Association of Critical-Care Nurses. https://www.aacn.org/education/ce-activities/nti18396/mindfulness-using-pause-principles-to-enhance-your-nursing-practice.

Salamah, B. (2020). Exploring the mental health needs of intensive care unit nurses facing the pandemic of covid-19. ScholarWorks@UARK. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/nursstudent/13/.

RE: Discussion – Week 10

Since Florence Nightingale’s conception of modern nursing in 1820, nursing has been a burgeoning and diverse profession. Over time, nursing specialty have expanded. The American Nurses Association (ANA) recognized nursing informatics as a specialty in 1992. (R2 Library, 2015). There are numerous nursing specializations, including public health, neonatal, obstetrics/gynecology, anesthesia, nursing informatics, mental health, etc. So many things influence a nurse’s decision regarding a specific speciality. It could be a personal decision, a significant life event, or a mentor; in my case, it was the work environment and the realization of the necessity for mental health.
Seven of my eight years as a nurse were spent in correctional nursing. My decision to pursue a master’s degree in nursing with a mental health specialization is heavily influenced by my exposure to the need for mental health practitioners in correctional settings and among the general community. In 2018, almost forty percent of all California convicts were diagnosed with a mental health issue. 14% of the general prison population is diagnosed with a significant mental health condition that increases the risk of suicide (Lyon, 2020). During the initial intake assessment in prison, undiagnosed and untreated mental health issues stemming from childhood would be observed. This untreated mental illness frequently leads to juvenile homes and ultimately to prisons for adults.
In certain instances, the inmate-patient has been in and out of foster care prior to entering juvenile or adult prison. If this inmate-patient is diagnosed and treated throughout their childhood and adolescence, they will not be incarcerated as adults. As a result of the existing shortage of mental health practitioners in prisons and the general population, as well as the tendency of persons with mental health issues ending up in prison, I decided to pursue a master’s degree in nursing and specialize in mental health. My academic objective is to earn a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) from Walden University and then work as a psychiatric nurse practitioner in a correctional setting.
Since its inception in 1986, the American Psychiatric Nurses Association (APNA) has represented more than 13,000 psychiatric-mental health nurses. APNA includes nurses of various educational levels who work in areas such as inpatient, outpatient, research, education, administration, clinical, private practice, military, and forensic (American Psychiatric Nurses Association, 2020). Similar to other professional organizations, APNA facilitates the exchange of information between its members. APNA fosters continuous education that will ultimately benefit patients with mental illness or substance use problems and enrich its members. APNA promotes the notion that mental health is the foundation of whole health. I have begun the process of joining the American psychiatric nurses organization (APNA) and the American nurses association since beginning this MSN program (ANA)

References
American Association of Psychiatric Nurses https://www.apna.org/i49/pages/index-cfm?pageid=3293
Lyon, E. (2020). The rate of prisoner suicide is highest in California. Criminal Justice News. https://doi.org/https://www.prisonlegalnews.org/news/2020/feb/4/prisoner-suicide-rates-highest-california/
R2 Library (Online service), American Nurses Association & American Nurses Association (2015). The second edition of Nursing Informatics: Scope and Standards of Practice. United States Nurses Association.

Response

As psychiatric nurses pursuing an MSN in mental health, I observe that we are in the same boat and headed in the same path. I appreciate how you explained, “For me, it was the work environment and recognizing the need for mental health.” You expressed this when explaining why you decided to become a mental health nurse practitioner. I concur with you that nurse practitioners are required in mental health. According to an article I read, the need for psychiatric treatment in underprivileged communities is growing rapidly. The mental health care system is challenged by this need (Frissora & Ranz, 2021). I served vulnerable populations, including the homeless and the destitute, for seven years as a mental health professional. Experience has shown me that working with mental health can be difficult. Care for the people with mental illness is complex and can be daunting. Utilizing mental health nurse practitioners appropriately within the mental health care system helps lessen the mental health requirements of the community (Frissora & Ranz, 2021). As there is a demand for nurse practitioners in mental health, we will not have to fight to find employment in this field. This is an additional reason for choosing mental health as our speciality.
Reference
Frissora, K. M., & Ranz, J. M. (2021). Fellowship in community psychiatry nurse practitioner preparation for mental health workforce expansion. Psychiatric Services, vol. 72, no. 1, pp. 91–93. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.201900420

Name: NURS_6003_Module06_Week10_Discussion_Rubri

Excellent Good Fair Poor
Main Posting
Points Range: 45 (45%) – 50 (50%)

Answers all parts of the discussion question(s) expectations with reflective critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module and current credible sources.

Supported by at least three current, credible sources.

Written clearly and concisely with no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style.

Points Range: 40 (40%) – 44 (44%)

Responds to the discussion question(s) and is reflective with critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

At least 75% of post has exceptional depth and breadth.

Supported by at least three credible sources.

Written clearly and concisely with one or no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style.

Points Range: 35 (35%) – 39 (39%)

Responds to some of the discussion question(s).

One or two criteria are not addressed or are superficially addressed.

Is somewhat lacking reflection and critical analysis and synthesis.

Somewhat represents knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

Post is cited with two credible sources.

Written somewhat concisely; may contain more than two spelling or grammatical errors.

Contains some APA formatting errors.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 34 (34%)

Does not respond to the discussion question(s) adequately.

Lacks depth or superficially addresses criteria.

Lacks reflection and critical analysis and synthesis.

Does not represent knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

Contains only one or no credible sources.

Not written clearly or concisely.

Contains more than two spelling or grammatical errors.

Does not adhere to current APA manual writing rules and style.

Main Post: Timeliness
Points Range: 10 (10%) – 10 (10%)
Posts main post by day 3.
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Does not post by day 3.
First Response
Points Range: 17 (17%) – 18 (18%)

Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings.

Responds fully to questions posed by faculty.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources.

Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 15 (15%) – 16 (16%)

Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are answered, if posed.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 13 (13%) – 14 (14%)

Response is on topic and may have some depth.

Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed.

Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 12 (12%)

Response may not be on topic and lacks depth.

Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are missing.

No credible sources are cited.

Second Response
Points Range: 16 (16%) – 17 (17%)

Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings.

Responds fully to questions posed by faculty.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources.

Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 14 (14%) – 15 (15%)

Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are answered, if posed.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 12 (12%) – 13 (13%)

Response is on topic and may have some depth.

Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed.

Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 11 (11%)

Response may not be on topic and lacks depth.

Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are missing.

No credible sources are cited.

Participation
Points Range: 5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Meets requirements for participation by posting on three different days.
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Does not meet requirements for participation by posting on 3 different days.
Total Points: 100
RE: Discussion – Week 10
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When I first started nursing, I worked on a gen/med floor in a level one trauma center. It gave me a good foundation for becoming a new nurse, but it was a slower-paced job than I had anticipated. Downtime has always been difficult for me, so I decided to change careers and work as an intensive care nurse. In a way, this is where I discovered my passion for action. At the end of each shift, I felt a strong sense of accomplishment and increased confidence in my abilities. And as I advanced to the position of charge nurse, I realized I was a natural leader. I liked working in a fast-paced environment, and people seemed to like me. With this in mind, I decided to advance my career by applying to the Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner (AG-ACNP) program at Walden. The workload as an ICU travel nurse, technically a “COVID ICU travel nurse,” has increased in the last year and a half. I couldn’t physically be with my family during this time for obvious reasons, which made coping alone difficult. I also began to notice that I was completely depleted of energy. I was exhausted! According to research, health workers can face a variety of psychological challenges when working in high-pressure and high-risk situations such as disasters and pandemics (Salamah, 2020). So, instead of taking the much-needed break, I decided to return to nursing school and keep the intensity going. Unfortunately, distraction is a coping mechanism I’ve mastered. So it’s clear that this is where I’ve been struggling a little with making a firm career decision. Though I enjoy caring for patients and assisting families, I began to wonder if working as a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was what I wanted to do. I knew I needed some direction and clarity if I wanted to continue my career as an acute care NP. I knew that as an active member of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN), I would be able to find information to help me deal with my fatigue and learn new ways to plan for career advancement in a field I once loved. Furthermore, the AACN provides resources to help nurses prioritize their own well-being while providing excellent care to patients and their families. Nurse leaders affiliated with the organization, for example, offer sessions on practical mindful activities to improve personal and organizational resilience during these difficult times in healthcare. As a result, nurses will learn how to incorporate strategic pauses and reflective moments into their workday (Bay, 2021). The American Association of Critical Care Nurses (AACN) is one of several professional nursing organizations whose primary focus is on critical care nursing for nurses working in acute care. For over 50 years, the AACN has provided progressive and critical care nurses with world-class resources, education, and support, and it has over 130,000 members (AACN, 2021). Some of the membership options for those interested in joining are listed below. The AACN website has information on membership fees.

  • Active membership is open to any registered nurse licensed in the United States interested in critical care nursing and is in good standing with their state or territory’s licensing office.  Additionally, nurses who work in research, administration, education, medical-surgical, telemetry, progressive care units, home health, or any other healthcare agency are qualified (AACN, 2021).
  • Any LVN or LPN, non-nurse professional, or student working in these fields, as well as any healthcare consumer or member of the business or political community, is eligible.  However, affiliate members cannot vote, hold office, or serve on national or chapter committees (AACN, 2021).
  • Professional nurses who have an RN license in a country other than the United States are eligible. Membership includes all AACN privileges; however, all benefits, including a member card, are provided digitally (through email or the Web).  International members are not eligible to run for office or participate on national or chapter committees (AACN, 2021).
  • Any resident of the United States (or a non-citizen of the United States who resides inside the United States) enrolled in an accredited professional nursing program and is not currently licensed as a registered nurse is eligible.  Membership in the AACN entitles them to all AACN advantages.  However, student members cannot vote, hold office, or serve on national or chapter committees (AACN, 2021).

References

American Association of Critical-Care Nurses. (2021). AACN Membership Types and Rates. https://www.aacn.org/membership/aacn-membership-types-and-rate

Bay, L. M. (2021). Mindfulness: Using Pause Principles to Enhance Your Nursing Practice. American Association of Critical-Care Nurses. https://www.aacn.org/education/ce-activities/nti18396/mindfulness-using-pause-principles-to-enhance-your-nursing-practice.

Salamah, B. (2020). Exploring the mental health needs of intensive care unit nurses facing the pandemic of covid-19. ScholarWorks@UARK. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/nursstudent/13/.

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