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Discussion: Big Data Risks and Rewards NURS 6051

Discussion: Big Data Risks and Rewards NURS 6051

https://nursingpaperslayers.com/discussion-big-data-risks-and-rewards-nurs-6051/

When you wake up in the morning, you may reach for your cell phone to respond to a few missed text or email messages. You may need to stop on your way to work to refuel your car. You may be required to swipe a key card at the door upon your arrival to gain access to the facility. Finally, before proceeding to your workstation, you may wish to purchase a cup of coffee from the cafeteria.

From the moment you wake, you are in fact a data-generation machine. Each use of your phone, every transaction you make using a debit or credit card, even your

Discussion Big Data Risks and Rewards NURS 6051

Discussion Big Data Risks and Rewards NURS 6051

entrance to your place of work, creates data. It begs the question: How much data do you generate each day? Many studies have been conducted on this, and the numbers are staggering: Estimates suggest that nearly 1 million bytes of data are generated every second for every person on earth.

As the volume of data increases, information professionals have looked for ways to use big data—large, complex sets of data that require specialized approaches to use effectively. Big data has the potential for significant rewards—and significant risks—to healthcare. In this Discussion, you will consider these risks and rewards.

To Prepare:https://nursingpaperslayers.com/discussion-big-data-risks-and-rewards-nurs-6051/

Review the Resources and reflect on the web article Big Data Means Big Potential, Challenges for Nurse Execs.
Reflect on your own experience with complex health information access and management and consider potential challenges and risks you may have experienced or observed.
By Day 3 of Week 5

Post a description of at least one potential benefit of using big data as part of a clinical system and explain why. Then, describe at least one potential challenge or risk of using big data as part of a clinical system and explain why. Propose at least one strategy you have experienced, observed, or researched that may effectively mitigate the challenges or risks of using big data you described. Be specific and provide examples.

Discussion: Big Data Risks and Rewards NURS 6051

By Day 6 of Week 5

Two days apart, provide at least two of your coworkers with further mitigation techniques or insight into their view of the opportunities and hazards associated with big data.

Please be aware that your classmates will be referred to as “colleagues” throughout this course.

Discussion – Collapse of Week 5
Introduction
Using big data in healthcare allows people to have a greater say in their own treatment and care decisions. As stated in the HITECH Act of 2009, this is a stated goal (Glassman, 2017). Creating a HIPAA-compliant and user-friendly interface to collect information from patients is one of the problems of this. Epic software is used in my hospital’s electronic health record system (EHR). As a whole, we have an 844-bed level-1 trauma hospital, which includes a children’s hospital and a number of outpatient acute care hospitals, in addition to various surgical centers and an 89-bed inpatient psychiatric facility offering partial hospitalization and intense outpatient programs. Every day, these hospitals treat hundreds, if not thousands, of patients. The amount of data created as a result of these meetings is virtually incomprehensible. Another important problem is capturing this data so that it can be examined in useful ways. EHR documentation contributors in healthcare settings, according to Glassman (2017), are nurses since they enter the most patient data into the EHR. Direct EHR input from the patient, in my opinion, should be just as significant. It is an ethical requirement to take into account patient preferences, culture, and values when including patients in their own care and allowing them to make their own healthcare decisions (McCormack & Elwyn, 2018). With the help of big data, the EHR may be directly communicated with via an app-based interface. My Chart is the tool of choice in this situation at my hospital.

MyChart

In order to create a safe, HIPAA-compliant interface that is user-friendly, My Chart has surmounted the obstacle. Epic Systems Corporation has developed a mobile app called MyChart. A mobile or desktop computer can access MyChart, which is secure, handy, and accessible at any time (MyChart, 2020). Using MyChart, users can add data to their own electronic health record. MyChart can also be used to prompt patients to provide additional information. An email notice or an app notification can be delivered to the patient to notify them of things like test results, appointment reminders, and other important information. This is something that the patient has control over.

Direct EHR data input is also possible with MyChart, which includes personal preferences like native language, prescription refill requests and appointment scheduling. The patient’s involvement in their own healthcare can have a positive impact on the patient’s outcomes. As an example, if the patient’s first language is not English, then translation services may be necessary in order to ensure that the healthcare team is aware of the patient’s grasp of the informed consent process.

MyChart’s use in patient communication and care coordination allows my company to make better use of the massive amounts of data it collects. Without the need for a face-to-face appointment, patients can access their medical records and contact directly with their providers. This efficiency enhances the software interface’s advantages.

Discussion: Big Data Risks and Rewards NURS 6051

Trying to Make Sense of All That Data

It has been a problem for my business to analyze and report on the vast amount of data that is stored in the EHR. An individual can become unwell if one of their body’s systems is disrupted, and an EHR with several interconnected systems can suffer the same fate (Thew, 2016). At my company, this is the case. When it comes to mental health information, the EHR interface is designed primarily to collect medical data, which makes it difficult and ineffective to collect narrative information. Daily notes require providers to type in a significant amount of narrative content. To make matters worse, they must sift through several narrative notes in order to discover relevant data, which is a time-consuming and ineffective process. It has come to our attention as a result of reviewing incident reports that critical information can be overlooked by providers, who then fail to include it in their notes for consecutive days. Essentially, the story loses information.

Recently, the business discovered that reporting and data analysis can be improved by capturing data discretely, such as by selecting flowsheet rows, or by selecting other selectable fields in the EHR. This is an on-going problem, and we’re doing everything we can to solve it. RN daily shift note templates have been studied and disassembled to provide separate data fields for which reports can be created. One example of this is group attendance.

In the psychiatric regions, there are weekly groups for both therapeutic and educational purposes. When a patient comes in, the RN can quickly select one of these group kinds by programming it into a quick-click field. Administrators can run reports based on this data if it is collected discretely. A report on group attendance, for example, can reveal which groups have the highest levels of attendance. After that, it will be possible to make decisions on which teams to keep, drop, or reschedule. An added benefit of this reporting capability is that it allows for staffing to be altered in accordance with group attendance.

Conclusion Efficient and discrete data capture will be critical in helping nursing leaders make sense of the massive volumes of patient care data generated today, as well as improving patient care, outcomes and staff satisfaction.

References

Glassman, K. S. (2017). Using data in nursing practice. American Nurse Today, 12(11), 45-47. Retrieved from https://www.myamericannurse.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/ant11-Data-1030.pdf

McCormack, J. & Elwyn, G. (2018). Shared decision is the only outcome that matters when it comes to evaluating evidence-based practice. BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine 23(4), 137-139. Retrieved from https://ebm.bmj.com/content/23/4/137.info

MyChart. (2020). Join over 100 million patients who manage their care with mychart. Retrieved from https://www.mychart.com/

Thew, J. (2016, April 19). Big data means big potential, challenges for nurse execs. Health Leaders. https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/nursing/big-data-means-big-potential-challenges-nurse-execs

Submission and Grading Information

Grading Criteria

To access your rubric:

Week 5 Discussion Rubric

Post by Day 3 and Respond by Day 6 of Week 5

To participate in this Discussion:

Week 5 Discussion

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Next Module

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Module

Module 4: Technologies Supporting Applied Practice and Optimal Patient Outcomes (Weeks 6-8)

Laureate Education (Producer). (2018). Informatics Tools and Technologies [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Accessible player

Learning Objectives

Students will:

Evaluate healthcare technology trends for data and information in nursing practice and healthcare delivery
Analyze challenges and risks inherent in healthcare technology
Analyze healthcare technology benefits and risks for data safety, legislation, and patient care
Evaluate healthcare technology impact on patient outcomes, efficiencies, and data management
Analyze research on the application of clinical systems to improve outcomes and efficiencies
Due By
Assignment
Week 6, Days 1–2
Read/Watch/Listen to the Learning Resources.
Compose your initial Discussion post.
Week 6, Day 3
Post your initial Discussion post.
Begin to compose your Assignment.
Week 6, Days 4-5
Review peer Discussion posts.
Compose your peer Discussion responses.
Continue to compose your Assignment.
Week 6, Day 6
Post at least two peer Discussion responses on two different days (and not the same day as the initial post).
Week 6, Day 7
Wrap up Discussion.
Week 7, Days 1-7
Continue to compose your Assignment.
Week 8, Days 1-6
Continue to compose your Assignment.
Week 8, Day 7
Deadline to submit your Assignment.

Learning Resources

Required Readings

McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. G. (2017). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (4th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Chapter 14, “The Electronic Health Record and Clinical Informatics” (pp. 267–287)
Chapter 15, “Informatics Tools to Promote Patient Safety and Quality Outcomes” (pp. 293–317)
Chapter 16, “Patient Engagement and Connected Health” (pp. 323–338)
Chapter 17, “Using Informatics to Promote Community/Population Health” (pp. 341–355)
Chapter 18, “Telenursing and Remote Access Telehealth” (pp. 359–388)

Dykes, P. C., Rozenblum, R., Dalal, A., Massaro, A., Chang, F., Clements, M., Collins, S. …Bates, D. W. (2017). Prospective evaluation of a multifaceted intervention to improve outcomes in intensive care: The Promoting Respect and Ongoing Safety Through Patient Engagement Communication and Technology Study. Critical Care Medicine, 45(8), e806–e813. doi:10.1097/CCM.0000000000002449

HealthIT.gov. (2018c). What is an electronic health record (EHR)? Retrieved from

https://www.healthit.gov/faq/what-electronic-health-record-ehr

 

Rao-Gupta, S., Kruger, D. Leak, L. D., Tieman, L. A., & Manworren, R. C. B. (2018). Leveraging interactive patient care technology to Improve pain management engagement. Pain Management Nursing, 19(3), 212–221.

 

Skiba, D. (2017). Evaluation tools to appraise social media and mobile applications. Informatics, 4(3), 32–40.

Required Media

Laureate Education (Producer). (2018). Public Health Informatics [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Accessible player

Laureate Education (Producer). (2018). Electronic Records and Managing IT Change [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Accessible player

Discussion Big Data Risks and Rewards NURS 6051 SAMPLE 1

RE: Discussion – Week 4

“Data is a discrete set of details related to a specific situation, patient, or population,” according to Laureate Education (2012). According to Laureate Education (2012), data becomes information, which becomes knowledge, which becomes wisdom, and so on. According to Thew (2016), big data is “a large complex data set that yields significantly more information when analyzed as a fully integrated data set when compared to the outputs achieved with smaller sets of the same data that are not integrated.”

Organizing and making sense of big data is a daunting task, but when done correctly, it has the potential to achieve great things. Preventative medicine/applications are one of the most exciting ways to use big data in my opinion (Vinay Shanthagiri, 2014). Medicine can be proactive rather than reactive by utilizing big data.

Big data knowledge encourages preventive health measures. Big data trends derived from a population of people diagnosed with hypertension, for example, reveal potential risk factors. Big data can lead to potential preventative factors when compared to those who do not have hypertension. Obtaining data on these patients yields information about potential risk and preventative factors. This information becomes knowledge, such as poor diet and lack of exercise, both of which are risk factors for hypertension. Based on this, healthcare providers can educate patients on wise preventative measures (such as improving diet and exercise) to help them avoid developing hypertension. Big data analysis is exciting because it can be applied to so many different illnesses, allowing healthcare to finally take a proactive rather than reactive approach.

The one aspect of big data that scares me is data security. Nobody wants their personal information to be public. I know I don’t want anyone passing by to see or hear my weight when I go to the doctor. Consider the possibility that all of your personal information, including your age, date of birth, diagnosis, medications, and surgeries, is available to anyone and everyone.

Dual verification is required at the hospital where I work. This is an extra layer of security. Employees log in using their unique employee number and a complex password (that changes every month). A PIN number is also sent to your phone or email by the program. Before accessing any company or patient data, this PIN number must be entered.

References

Laureate Education (Executive Producer). (2012). Data, Information, knowledge and wisdom continuum [Multimedia file]. Baltimore, MD: Author. Retrieved from http://mym.cdn.laureate-media.com/2dett4d/Walden/NURS/6051/03/mm/continuum/index.html

McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. G. (2017). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (4th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. G. (2017).

Thew, J. (2016, April 19). Big data means big potential, challenges for nurse execs. Retrieved from https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/nursing/big-data-means-big-potential-challenges-nurse-execs

Vinay Shanthagiri. (2014). Big Data in Health Informatics [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4W6zGmH_pOw

Discussion Big Data Risks and Rewards NURS 6051 SAMPLE 2

RE: Initial post – Week 4

Evidence Based medicine is the core of the USA healthcare system. One cannot deny the fact that data is an integral part of evidence-based medicine. As mentioned at the description of discussion, we used, and we leave data from the time we wake up to the time we go to bed and during sleep as well. EMR has helped to reduce medical errors and work a bit easily. In a recent review exploring the definition of “big data,” Ward and Barker amalgamate concepts of size, complexity, and technology to define “big data” as “the storage and analysis of large and/or complex data sets using a series of techniques including…machine-learning” (Ward & barker, 2013)  As you mentioned, checking boxes during an assessment prevents an error. At the same time, it has become very tedious task and monotonous charting for the patient. since EMR’s widespread implementation into the healthcare system, electronic medical records have been met with resistance. Commonly cited barriers to usage are the time it takes to learn and use an EHR, workflow disruption, poor communication between users, lack of interoperability, and technical problems (Ajami and Bagheri-Tadi, 2013).

EMR is a technology advantage and like as you mentioned, it is not perfect either. There are multiple EMR options available in the market and each one has its pros and cons. An excellent example of innovative electronic data collection is the system used by participants in the Nightingale Tracker System pilot study, in which nursing students traveling to rural clinical sites submitted information via handheld devices while miles away from their preceptor- supervisor. (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2018, p.470). As mentioned In the article of “Big Data Means Big Potential, Challenges for Nurse Exec”  Failure to recognize how this data interacts throughout the system is a big challenge.  (Thew,2016). In your scenario with the Integumentary system, the system doesn’t have all available options and hence staff has to enter details manually. We had same problem as well and hence my organization went for optimization 15 months after launching their new EMR system. It is a continuous learning process and data defiantly helps us to understand the progress.

References

Ajami, S., & Bagheri-Tadi, T., (2013). Barriers for adopting electronic health records (EHRs) by physicians. Acta Informatica Medica, 21(2), 129-134. doi: 10.5455/aim.2013.21.129-134

McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. G. (2017). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (4th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. G. (2017).

Thew, J. (n.d.). Big Data Means Big Potential, Challenges for Nurse Execs. Retrieved from https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/nursing/big-data-means-big-potential-challenges-nurse-execs

Ward JS, Barker A. Undefined By Data: A Survey of Big Data Definitions. arXiv:1309.5821; 2013.

Discussion Big Data Risks and Rewards NURS 6051 Rubric Detail

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Content
Name: NURS_5051_Module03_Week05_Discussion_Rubric

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List View

Excellent Good Fair Poor
Main Posting
Points Range: 45 (45%) – 50 (50%)
Answers all parts of the discussion question(s) expectations with reflective critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module and current credible sources.

Supported by at least three current, credible sources.

Written clearly and concisely with no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style.

Points Range: 40 (40%) – 44 (44%)
Responds to the discussion question(s) and is reflective with critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

At least 75% of post has exceptional depth and breadth.

Supported by at least three credible sources.

Written clearly and concisely with one or no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style.

Points Range: 35 (35%) – 39 (39%)
Responds to some of the discussion question(s).

One or two criteria are not addressed or are superficially addressed.

Is somewhat lacking reflection and critical analysis and synthesis.

Somewhat represents knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

Post is cited with two credible sources.

Written somewhat concisely; may contain more than two spelling or grammatical errors.

Contains some APA formatting errors.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 34 (34%)
Does not respond to the discussion question(s) adequately.

Lacks depth or superficially addresses criteria.

Lacks reflection and critical analysis and synthesis.

Does not represent knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

Contains only one or no credible sources.

Not written clearly or concisely.

Contains more than two spelling or grammatical errors.

Does not adhere to current APA manual writing rules and style.
Main Post: Timeliness
Points Range: 10 (10%) – 10 (10%)
Posts main post by day 3.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Does not post by day 3.
First Response
Points Range: 17 (17%) – 18 (18%)
Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings.

Responds fully to questions posed by faculty.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources.

Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 15 (15%) – 16 (16%)
Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are answered, if posed.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 13 (13%) – 14 (14%)
Response is on topic and may have some depth.

Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed.

Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 12 (12%)
Response may not be on topic and lacks depth.

Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are missing.

No credible sources are cited.
Second Response
Points Range: 16 (16%) – 17 (17%)
Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings.

Responds fully to questions posed by faculty.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources.

Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 14 (14%) – 15 (15%)
Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are answered, if posed.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 12 (12%) – 13 (13%)
Response is on topic and may have some depth.

Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed.

Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 11 (11%)
Response may not be on topic and lacks depth.

Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are missing.

No credible sources are cited.
Participation
Points Range: 5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Meets requirements for participation by posting on three different days.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Does not meet requirements for participation by posting on 3 different days.
Total Points: 100
Name: NURS_5051_Module03_Week05_Discussion_Rubric

RE: Discussion – Week 5 Initial Post

          Healthcare settings are involved with a lot of technology that holds a very large amount of data.  From patient names and demographics to

lab results and diagnoses, the patient’s information is very important to keep private.  The implementation of patient portals has been a very

big help for patient’s and getting information to and from their physicians.  The patient can check in prior to their appointments by filling out

their paperwork online.  This allows for the front desk to lessen their workload and to be better able to help the patient.  “The patient portal allows

for better patient communication, keeping front office work efficient, better patient-physician relationships due to 24hr access, allowing

improvement of clinical outcomes such as prescription refills” (DeMarco, 2017).  Patient portals have been implemented in both hospitals and

clinics. They allow the patient to look at any results, ask for prescription refills, and set up appointments all from the comfort of their home and

not having to wait on the phone or leave a message for someone to get back with them.

Although the patient portal is a great tool for the physicians and staff of healthcare facilities, they also have some flaws.  “Some risks

include:  reliance as a sole method of communication, possible security breaches resulting in HIPAA violations, and posting of critical

diagnostic results prior to provider discussions” (mlmic.com, 2021).  Patient information breach is the number one issue that could happen when

using the patient portal.  There is no computer system that is perfect, but it is extremely important to protect the patient’s information.

One way to protect the patient’s information is to “make sure private health information is safe from unauthorized access, is hosted on secure

connections, and accessed via an encrypted password-protected logon.  Also, remember to remind patients to protect their username and

password” (Heath, 2016).  Patient portals are great when used correctly.  It is important to educate both the patient and the healthcare staff about

the benefits and risks of their patient portal.  Patients just need to understand that it is a wonderful tool, as long as they understand how to use

it.

References

DeMarco, A.  (2017).  Patient portal:  what makes it so great for a provider?  micromd.com.

Heath, S.  (2016).  What are the top pros and cons of adopting patient portals?  patientengagementhit.com.

mlmic.com.  (2021).  Risk management tip:  the proper use of patient portals.

Name: NURS_5051_Module03_Week05_Discussion_Rubric

Excellent Good Fair Poor
Main Posting
Points Range: 45 (45%) – 50 (50%)

Answers all parts of the discussion question(s) expectations with reflective critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module and current credible sources.

Supported by at least three current, credible sources.

Written clearly and concisely with no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style.

Points Range: 40 (40%) – 44 (44%)

Responds to the discussion question(s) and is reflective with critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

At least 75% of post has exceptional depth and breadth.

Supported by at least three credible sources.

Written clearly and concisely with one or no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style.

Points Range: 35 (35%) – 39 (39%)

Responds to some of the discussion question(s).

One or two criteria are not addressed or are superficially addressed.

Is somewhat lacking reflection and critical analysis and synthesis.

Somewhat represents knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

Post is cited with two credible sources.

Written somewhat concisely; may contain more than two spelling or grammatical errors.

Contains some APA formatting errors.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 34 (34%)

Does not respond to the discussion question(s) adequately.

Lacks depth or superficially addresses criteria.

Lacks reflection and critical analysis and synthesis.

Does not represent knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

Contains only one or no credible sources.

Not written clearly or concisely.

Contains more than two spelling or grammatical errors.

Does not adhere to current APA manual writing rules and style.

Main Post: Timeliness
Points Range: 10 (10%) – 10 (10%)
Posts main post by day 3.
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Does not post by day 3.
First Response
Points Range: 17 (17%) – 18 (18%)

Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings.

Responds fully to questions posed by faculty.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources.

Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 15 (15%) – 16 (16%)

Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are answered, if posed.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 13 (13%) – 14 (14%)

Response is on topic and may have some depth.

Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed.

Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 12 (12%)

Response may not be on topic and lacks depth.

Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are missing.

No credible sources are cited.

Second Response
Points Range: 16 (16%) – 17 (17%)

Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings.

Responds fully to questions posed by faculty.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources.

Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 14 (14%) – 15 (15%)

Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are answered, if posed.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 12 (12%) – 13 (13%)

Response is on topic and may have some depth.

Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed.

Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 11 (11%)

Response may not be on topic and lacks depth.

Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are missing.

No credible sources are cited.

Participation
Points Range: 5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Meets requirements for participation by posting on three different days.
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Does not meet requirements for participation by posting on 3 different days.
Total Points: 100
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